Jeremy Corbyn and the cry for justice and self-assertion

Jeremy Corbyn
Gilad Atzmon writes:

The meaning of Corbyn has little to do with Jeremy Corbyn the member of parliament, his prospects of bringing about change or his chances of being elected.

The meaning of Corbyn is that he is symbolic of the revival of the search for meaning – a nostalgic longing for the political.

Within the context of the old liberal democratic fantasy, the political was thought to be an extension of the people’s will and whims.

But this has changed radically within the present post-political conditions. In the last four decades, we Westerners have been reduced to mere consumers. Our politicians have evolved accordingly. Politics has morphed into the system that facilitates consumption on behalf of big conglomerates.

Corbyn the symbol has come to embody the general fatigue with this post-political condition – frustration with austerity, endless immoral Zionist-neoconservative wars, the loss of manufacturing, the lobby, divisive identity nonsense and cultural Marxism as opposed to Marxism. Corbyn serves as a reminder of the revolution that never happened. He has reminded us that we are one after all.

The pathetic dance of despair performed last week by the Zionist continuum, made up of large segments of the British media, the Labour Party leadership and pretty much every British Jewish institution in opposition to Corbyn, is staggering yet hardly new or unique. They have kindly reminded us what we are up against.

But Britons were not fooled: they immediately detected the foreign attempt to hijack their battle for justice and replace it with “Jewish sensitivities”.

Whether Corbyn can provide the goods while operating within a horrid Zionised Labour Party is an open question.

But Corbyn the symbol emphasises the cry for change, a genuine demand for justice expressed by the British people as they wake up to the real possibility of themselves as patriots – a collective of people who care for each other as opposed to an aloof collection of self-centric tribal identities who care only for themselves.

Print Friendly