Jonathan Djanogly

Jonathan Djanogly, example of UK’s Israel stooges

Stuart Littlewood examines the behaviour of an Israel flag waver in the UK parliament, Jonathan Djanogly, one of the “dirty dozen” lawmakers who voted against recognising Palestine as an independent state. More »

Gaza prison

How Israel is turning Gaza into a super-max prison

Jonathan Cook argues that the Palestinians’ humanitarian needs and their right in international law to resist their oppressor are being sacrificed to make the enforcement of Israel’s occupation more efficient. More »

Anti lobby demonstration

America’s special interest problem

Lawrence Davidson argues that only popular action can free United States legislators from the shackles of special interest groups, or lobbies, that have hijacked and corrupted US foreign and domestic policies. More »

India's space mission

India’s space madness amid astronomical poverty 

Graham Peebles questions the justice and wisdom of India’s ruling elite, which spends USD1 billion annually on its space programme while India has the world’s highest number of people practising open defecation. More »

US Congress traitors

Israel, the US Congress and treason

Alan Hart explains how members of Congress who put Israel’s interests ahead of those of the United States could be charged with treason, despite the US constitution’s narrow definition of a traitor. More »

Pro-Palestinian demonstration in Britain

Israel ignoring “tectonic change” in public opinion

Uri Avnery argues that, oblivious to Israelis, a tectonic change in public attitude towards Israel is underway, as shown by the UK parliament’s and Sweden’s decisions to recognise the state of Palestine. More »

David Cameron and Binyamin Netanyahu

Cameron still hasn’t got the message on Palestine

Stuart Littlewood examines the spurious arguments used by the British government to try to wheedle its way out of recognising Palestine as a state, as emphatically demanded by the British parliament. More »

UK parliament votes for Palestine recognition

A shot across the bows of Israel and its stooges

Stuart Littlewood says the UK parliament’s vote in favour of recognising Palestine as a state is a clear instruction to the government to act with honour and decency towards the Palestinian people. More »

Map showing how Palestine is being swallowed up by Jewish squatter colonies

The UK House of Commons Palestine vote…

Alan Hart explains why the two-state solution to the Palestine-Israel conflict – the premise on which British lawmakers voted in favour of recognising a Palestinian state – is no longer possible. More »

UK Palestine recognition

Which way will the UK Parliament jump…

Stuart Littlewood looks at how Israel’s flag wavers in the lower chamber of the British parliament are rallying their forces to thwart a motion to unilaterally recognise the state of Palestine. More »

Daily Archives: April 15, 2013

Poll reveals Israeli support for apartheid

It should come as no surprise to anyone interested in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict that a significant proportion of Israeli Jews are racist. Anecdotally, this has been clear for as long as Israel existed, but increasingly hard facts are giving substance to casual observations.

The latest is an opinion poll which found that one-third of Israel’s Jewish population support either annexing the West Bank without giving Palestinians civil rights, or perpetuating the status quo, in which Palestinians have no civil rights.

The survey was commissioned by an organization called Blue White Future, which published its results in Hebrew on 14 April. It questioned 500 Jewish Israelis, representing the country’s adult Jewish population.

Below is the essence of the findings, courtesy of +972 news magazine, whose article on the poll results can be found here.

  • 57% (including 87% of Zionist social-democratic Meretz voters) believe Israel should determine its borders unilaterally according to the current route of the apartheid wall, which cuts deep into the occupied West Bank, winding through Palestinian land well east of the 1949 Armistice Lines (the Green Line)
  • 61% support a two-state solution (39% oppose)
  • 23% support a bi-national state but “without giving Palestinians full civil rights” (up substantially from last year’s 13%). This means almost a quarter of Israeli Jews want to live under an Israeli apartheid regime where Palestinians are institutionally disenfranchized
  • 13% think the situation should remain as it is (“de facto Israeli control of Palestinians without annexation” of the West Bank), which means maintaining the status quo. However, the status quo is is a de facto a bi-national state (or “one state”), in which every person between the Jordan River and the Mediterranean lives under varying degrees of Israeli rule, so it’s fair to add this 13% to the 23% who support a bi-national state but “without giving Palestinians full civil rights”, which means
  • 36% of Jewish Israelis support apartheid, i.e. Israeli control of the West Bank without Palestinian civil rights, and
  • 7% of Jewish Israelis support giving Palestinians full civil rights within a bi-national state.

The conclusion? As Mairav Zonszein of +972 notes,

  1. Israelis are admitting the country does not have defined and recognized borders;
  2. Israelis are perfectly happy pushing forward unilaterally despite repeated claims by both the Israeli and US governments that no unilateral steps should be taken by either side in the conflict; and
  3. Israelis don’t care that the bantustans created by the separation wall and the settlements are unacceptable to Palestinians or the international community, thus ignoring the impracticality of this option as a long-term solution – not to mention an unjust one.

Finally, it is noteworthy that, on the bi-national state, those polled were asked: “Which of the following scenarios would you prefer in order to maintain Israel’s character as a Jewish and democratic state 20 years from now?”

As Zonszein notes, “this wording is quite telling since the very notion that we need to try very hard to ‘keep’ Israel Jewish and democratic inherently reflects that being both Jewish and democratic isn’t really working out”.